Paralysis of the bladder and associated neurological sequelæ of spinal anæsthesia (cauda equina syndrome)
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Paralysis of the bladder and associated neurological sequelæ of spinal anæsthesia (cauda equina syndrome) by Fergus R. Ferguson

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Published by John Wright & Sons in Bristol .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Cauda equina.,
  • Bladder.,
  • Spinal anesthesia -- Complications.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesBritish journal of surgery.
Statementby Fergus R. Ferguson and Kenneth H. Watkins.
ContributionsWatkins, Kenneth H.
The Physical Object
Paginationp. 735-752 :
Number of Pages752
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18565600M

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Ferguson FR, Watkins KH: Paralysis of the bladder and associated neurological sequelae of spinal anaesthesia (cauda equina syndrome). Br J Surg ; – 3. MacDonald AD, Watkins KH: An experimental investigation into the cause of paralysis following spinal anaesthesia. Br Author: Norihito Kitagawa.   Neurologic complications, although infrequent, may follow spinal or general anesthesia. There are reports in the literature of cranial nerve palsies, 1 hemiplegia 2 and peripheral neuropathies 2a following general as well as spinal anesthesia. Certain neurologic complications are prone to follow spinal anesthesia while others are more frequent after general by: Neurological complications after a well-conducted spinal anaesthesia though reported, are rare. Various lesions as aseptic meningitis, anterior spinal artery syndrome have been documented. NEUROLOGICAL SEQUELAE OFACUTE TRAUMA 9Sf) VOL. A, NO. 5,OCTOBER dislocation. Itisparticularly interesting tonote that thejugular-compression test didnot. reveal acomplete subarachnoid block ontwo occasions, five days apart, and yet cerebro-spinal fluid protein wasdefinitely elevated atthe first test and had increased bythe time.

Neurological deficits following spinal anaesthesia are rare. We report two cases of persistent sacral nerve root deficits after continuous spinal anaesthesia (CSA) performed with hyperbaric. When neurological (nervous system) conditions affect the bladder, it is called neurogenic bladder. There are two major types of bladder control problems that are associated with a neurogenic bladder. Depending on the nerves involved and nature of the damage, the bladder becomes either overactive (spastic or hyper-reflexive) or underactive.   Immediate neurological sequelae Aside from the transient expected sympathetic, sensory and motor blockade, well-conducted epidural or spinal anaesthesia should not cause neurological dysfunction. Hornet's syndrome (miosis, ptosis, enophthalmos and anhidrosis) occurs predominantly during epidural anaesthesia in obstetric patients (Abboud et al. The understanding of triggering factors of spinal anaesthesia-induced neurological complications may prevent them and help early diagnosis and treatment. [1] We present a case of motor paralysis with bladder and bowel involvement post-spinal anaesthesia in a patient who underwent a .

Neurological deficits following spinal anaesthesia are rare. We report two cases of persistent sacral nerve root deficits after continuous spinal anaesthesia (CSA) performed with hyperbaric lidocaine through a lumbar microcatheter. In both cases the dose of 5% lidocaine ( and ml) was greater than usual. In the immediate postoperative period the constellation of neurological deficits.   Spinal anaesthesia influences urination by blocking all afferent nerve fibres, rendering the patient unable to feel bladder distension or urinary urgency. Bladder catheterization is not innocuous; it carries the risk of urethral trauma and more severe complications, including infection and haematologic spread that may reach the surgical site. The spinal cord ends at the upper portion of the lumbar (lower back) spine. The individual nerve roots at the end of the spinal cord that provide motor and sensory function to the legs and the bladder continue along in the spinal canal. The cauda equina is the continuation of these nerve roots in the lumbar region. In addition, some children are born with nerve problems that can keep the bladder from releasing urine, leading to urinary infections or kidney damage. How will the doctor test for nerve damage and bladder control problems? Any evaluation for a health problem begins with a medical history and a general physical examination.